Staying the Course

It is appropriate to consider the direction our profession should take in the 21st century. Sociologist Walter Wardwell suggests that chiropractic become a “limited medical specialty” such as dentistry, optometry or podiatry, which does not challenge the theoretical basis of allopathic medicine.(1) Chiropractic college faculty member Craig Nelson proposes that chiropractic be limited to a […]

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Spinal Abnormalities and Visceral Disease

Somatovisceral relationships have been described in the medical literature of the early 20th century, and related to “minor curvatures” affecting specific levels of the spine. Winsor (1) examined 50 cadavers with disease in 139 organs, and found “curve of the vertebrae” belonging to the same sympathetic segments as the diseased organs 128 times. In 10, […]

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Shake and Bake – Revisited

A previous column (1) revealed the news that physical therapy is no more effective than a placebo for the relief of pain in musculoskeletal conditions, and may actually make things worse. The evidence in support of this claim is growing. According to a recent study by Feine and Lund (2) of McGill University, there is […]

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Shake and Bake

There are doctors of chiropractic who employ physical therapy modalities in clinical practice. I’ve heard many reasons for doing so. Some feel that modalities help to relieve pain. Others profess to be “preparing” the patient for adjustment by relaxing the paraspinal muscles. A handful even admit to using modalities “for the money.” Whether their objectives […]

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sEMG Reliability Update

An important issue when selecting clinical examination procedures is reliability. Reliability is a measure of the ability to reproduce a measurement, which is expressed as a coefficient ranging from 0.00 to 1.00. Perfect reliability results in a coefficient of 1.00, while chance agreement would be 0.0. As an example, Hass and Panzer (1) noted that […]

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Science vs. Scientism

By Dr. Christopher Kent A perception that medicine is “scientific” and chiropractic is “unproven” seems to pervade a growing element of our profession. This perspective has resulted in a low perceived value of our unique principle and practice. Science provides investigators with a useful method of inquiry. Scientific methods have led the healing arts out […]

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Research Review

The last two years have been marked by some very exciting research publications related to vertebral subluxation. In case you missed them, here are some highlights: A comprehensive review of models of vertebral subluxation (1). A proposed model of vertebral subluxation reflecting traditional concepts and recent advances in health and science (2). Detailed description of […]

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The Randomized Clinical Trial – Fool’s Gold?

The randomized clinical trial (RCT) is considered by some (including a few chiropractors) to be the “gold standard” for clinical research. (1) This methodology, however, is being subjected to scrutiny, and coming up short. Jadad and Rennie (2) note that “RCTs can be vulnerable to multiple types of bias at all stages of their life […]

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Quality of Life

Demonstrating the health benefits of chiropractic care presents a challenge. Many chiropractic researchers have followed the path of allopathic medicine. These investigators have attempted to determine how chiropractic care affects the course of specific symptoms or disease entities. Such designs potentially limit chiropractic to the “treatment” of disorders which pass muster. These designs fail to […]

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